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The power of ‘Me too’

The power of ‘Me too’

Loraine Masiya Mponela

from left to right: Loraine and Lilian, photo taken on 20th March 2021 at War Memorial Park, Coventry during a Black Lives Matter protest
From left to right: Loraine and Lilian, photo taken on 20th March 2021 at War Memorial Park, Coventry during a Black Lives Matter protest.

I arrived in Coventry not knowing where I was. I felt lost. I had been in asylum for 3 months. I was already broken. But God already had a plan for me. I met my housemates.

My tears were wiped when I heard them say “Me Too, I have been asylum seeker since…. (mentions a year)”

When I heard their stories, it made me stronger. My face lit up. Such is the power of ‘Me Too’. Each time I start complaining about my situation I remind myself of that moment.

One of the ladies I met, Lilian, held my hand and took me to the food bank, then to asylum seekers action group (CARAG) and then to other local services. More echoes of ‘me too’. There, I find my healing.  Continue reading “The power of ‘Me too’”

Right to work in care homes for asylum seekers is welcome but..

Loraine Masiya Mponela

In order to solve the current crisis in the care industry, the UK government is planning to allow asylum seekers who have waited for home office decisions on their cases for over 1 year to work in care homes. This would be reviewed after 1 year.

It is a welcome move and presents some level of hope to asylum seekers who generally live below the poverty line.

I personally have worked in care for over 7 years in the past and I specialized in palliative care when I had the right to work. I will always value the experience and privilege of having been to support people before leaving the world. So I know how important this work is. It transformed my life to say the least.

However, allowing asylum seekers to work in care industry ONLY presents its own challenges. Not all asylum seekers who meet the right to work criteria can actually work in care for a number of reasons: Continue reading “Right to work in care homes for asylum seekers is welcome but..”